Press Coverage

Celebrate LGBTQ History Month with this interactive map of historic N.Y.C. sites

October 12, 2018
By: Gabrielle Golenda

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Members of the Gay Liberation Front with GAY POWER shirts at City Hall, New York in 1969-1972 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Members of the Gay Liberation Front with GAY POWER shirts at City Hall, New York in 1969-1972 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

This month is LGBTQ History Month and to honor it The Municipal Art Society (MAS) of New York featured a panel about historic sites associated with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movement at this week’s MAS Summit in New York City. Every year, the conference explores how present-day issues can be informed and challenged by historical advocacy.

On Tuesday the ninth annual program featured a lecture led by the co-director of the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project, Ken Lustbader, who, in his own words, is trying to put LGBT history on the map by “looking at it through a rainbow lens.”

Stonewall Inn Window with a protest sign (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Stonewall Inn Window with a protest sign (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Riots, a police raid at the Stonewall Inn gay bar in New York’s Greenwich Village. Lustbader recalled that the riot wasn’t the first at the Christopher Street institution, but one that is especially remembered for the days-long protest where patrons were inspired to fight back, forever marking the N.Y.C. neighborhood as the unofficial cradle of the LGBT rights movement.

Stonewall Inn in 1969 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Stonewall Inn in 1969 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Stonewall Inn is just one of the places the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project documents in its interactive map of historic and cultural sites associated with the community in all five boroughs. From the Angel of the Waters statue atop the Bethesda Fountain—an 1860s masterpiece by lesbian sculptor Emma Stebbins and the earliest public artwork by a woman in New York City—to Carnegie Hall—the venue famous for hosting countless performances and works by LGBT artists—the list of historic sites reaches way beyond bars and clubs.

Continuously being added to, the network of hundreds of locations illustrates the richness of the movement’s history and its influence in the United States. Covering sites dating from the city’s founding in the 17th century to the year 2000, it currently lists 5 locations in Staten Island, 12 in Queens, 123 in Manhattan, 8 in Brooklyn, and 4 in The Bronx. The 150 pins presently live on the map can be filtered by cultural significance, neighborhood, era, and LGBT category.

Screenshot of the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project interactive map (Courtesy NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project)

Screenshot of the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project interactive map (Courtesy NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project)

The organization also offers themed tours that rotate throughout the year, including ones on Jewish New York, Transgender History, and The AIDS Crisis.

Many of the movement’s historic sites were unappreciated and a vast majority remain completely unknown. Landmarking LGBT sites comes with its own set of unique challenges. When a potential landmark cannot be evaluated on architectural grounds alone, a site’s social history can be difficult to establish because of a lack of proper documentation of LGBT sites. According to Lustbader, there’s historically been almost no record of various sites keeping because of stigma and fear of exposure. There’s another caveat: proving identity and gender can be difficult for LGBT people.

Protesters holding Christopher Street Liberation Day banner, 1970 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Protesters holding Christopher Street Liberation Day banner, 1970 (Diana Davies/Courtesy New York Public Library)

Today, there are now 17 LGBT-related sites of the more than 93,000 listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Lustbader and fellow project directors Andrew S. Dolkart and Jay Shockley confronted these challenges with 25 years of LGBT-specific research conducted by historic preservation professionals and numerous outreach events and crowdsourcing opportunities to develop a step-by-step guide to evaluate state and national LGBT register listings. The guide and all of their research can be accessed in the Historic Context Statement for LGBT History in New York.

Discover hundreds of places that represent NYC’s LGBT past on nyclgbtsites.org. Each site contains descriptive historical accounts, contemporary and archival photographs, related ephemera, and multimedia presentations. Happy cruising!

 

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