overview

Since the late 1960s, LGBT New Yorkers have organized marches of various kinds to promote pride and visibility, protest against exclusion and discrimination. and unite as a community in public space.

Reflecting the importance of such events, scholars have agreed that the first-ever New York City Pride March (held in June 1970) and subsequent annual marches around the country helped solidify the significance of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in LGBT history.

This curated collection features LGBT-specific marches and protests that have taken place around the city.

Header Photo caption

Christopher Street Liberation Day poster, June 28, 1970. Courtesy of the New York Public Library.

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Featured Historic Sites (6)

A
Washington Place, west of Sixth Avenue
New York City's first ever Pride March was held on Sunday, June 28, 1970 (the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall uprising), and, much to the organizers' surprise, attracted thousands of... Learn More
B
89th Street & 37th Avenue
In 1993, the inaugural Queens Pride Parade and Multicultural Festival took place in the historically gay neighborhood of Jackson Heights and was the first such event to be organized in... Learn More
C
Madison Square Park
For several years in the 1990s, the South Asian Lesbian and Gay Association (SALGA) led "Desi Dhamaka" protests in Madison Square Park in response to being banned from participating in... Learn More
D
Myrtle Avenue & Cornelia Street
On March 13, 1993, the March for Truth was organized by the Anti-Violence Project and Queens Gays and Lesbians United, along Myrtle Avenue in Ridgewood, Queens (District 24), to counter... Learn More
E
5th Avenue & 3rd Street
The first Brooklyn Pride Parade took place on Saturday, June 14, 1997, becoming the third such march to be organized in New York City after those in Manhattan and Queens.... Learn More
F
43rd Street & Skillman Avenue
In 2000, the inaugural St. Pat’s for All Parade took place in the historically Irish neighborhoods of Sunnyside and Woodside, Queens. The event, which still runs, was founded by LGBT... Learn More